A number of commercial or public buildings have secure areas designated only for employees or those who’ve paid. This could be anywhere from a convention center to a museum. It can be tempting to just hire a guard to man the door or entry. Let’s take a look at why this isn’t the best security practice.

Security

Security is looser with only a paid guard monitoring off-limits areas. After all, guards are fallible humans just like the rest of us. Even a second of inattention can potentially mean someone slipping by.

If you want a truly excellent level of security, you should pair a guard with other methods.

  • Security cameras with someone monitoring them lends an extra level of watchfulness. If someone suspicious is lurking around, back end security can alert the guard.
  • Coded doors ensure that no one can slip past a guard into a secured area. The guard can let authorized people in or they can use key cards under the guard’s supervision.

Safety

A guard can handle most basic threats. However, if guarding a high security area, there’s the risk of higher level threats. If you’ve got coveted information or valuables secured behind a guard, there’s the risk of an organized attack. A single guard can quickly be overpowered by a group.

For guard and employee safety, implementing more security methods is critical.

  • An emergency button that alerts the police without any audible signal to criminals is incredibly valuable. For instance, a guard or employee can set off the alarm and police will arrive shortly, stopping intruders and handling them appropriately.
  • Visible cameras around the secured area are a great deterrent. If a would-be intruder sees that there are cameras where they’re hoping to cause trouble, they’re less likely to attempt it. This lowers the risk of violence and keeps guards safe from provocation.

Legality

When it comes to secure areas in part of a public or commercial building, navigating legalities can become necessary. To keep yourself and your business protected legally, we recommend cameras for the following reasons:

  • Cameras provide evidence of intrusion and potential theft. If you take an intruder to court and they try to lie about their intentions, the evidence will speak for itself.
  • Having video evidence makes it much easier to catch an intruder if they’ve escaped. It will usually catch at least a few frames of an intruder’s face. Even when partially covered, this gives the police a jumping-off point in their investigation.
  • Cameras protect you from false claims. If there’s some kind of altercation near the entrance to a secure area, video will help in proving that your guard acted appropriately. It’s not uncommon for intruders to play it off as if they weren’t doing anything and were intercepted unprovoked. Cameras prevent fraudulent claims against you, especially in the case of accidental injuries.